Swedish Overshot Experience

Experience builds on experience. The more I practice the classic Swedish weave structures, the more freedom I have in the process. Dice weave, halvdräll, and, now, this monksbelt, are all related. These are variations of overshot. I am putting what I know into practice, even though this is the first time I have woven monksbelt on my own loom. (My prior experience with monksbelt was first in a workshop with Joanne Hall, and then, under Becky Ashenden’s tutelage at Vävstuga Swedish Classics.)

Colorful Fårö wool is used for the monksbelt pattern weft.

Colorful Fårö wool is used for the monksbelt pattern weft.

Plan projects from start to finish, dress the loom single-handedly, use complex threading and complicated treadling, and weave with multiple shuttles. Do you relish these challenges? It is possible to weave things that don’t require as much training or practice. You can find a pattern on Pinterest or in a magazine, and do what “everybody” is doing. Not much is required of “everybody” in the crowd.

Classic monksbelt pattern with innovative color variations.

Classic monksbelt patterning is repeated with different color variations.

Swedish overshot, such as monksbelt, uses two shuttles--one for fine thread, and one for the thicker pattern weft. Warp is 16/2 cotton. Ground weave weft is 16/2 cotton. Pattern weft is 61 Fårö wool. Sett is 22 1/2 ends per inch. Weft density is 30 pattern picks per inch, with 2 tabby picks in between.

Swedish overshot, such as monksbelt, uses two shuttles–one for fine thread, and one for the thicker pattern weft. Warp is 16/2 cotton. Ground weave weft is 16/2 cotton. Pattern weft is 6/1 Fårö wool. Sett is 22 1/2 ends per inch. Weft density is 30 pattern picks per inch, with 2 tabby picks in between.

But some people strive to learn, and practice what they learn, building on previous experience. Consider truth. You are responsible for the truth you know. The more you are taught, the more that is required of you. And as you practice the truth you know, you discover the freedom that comes along in the process.

May you grow in experience.

Happy weaving,
Karen

6 Comments

  • Alaa says:

    I’ve yet to try Monk’s Belt but your weaving is inspiring.

  • Marie says:

    I have never woven Monks Belt but find it so exciting as I watch it come off of
    your loom. It looks like magic. I have put it on the list of projects for my
    4 shaft loom. Then I check out dice weave and halvdrall and my mind started to race with possibilities. Weaving is great for starting the creative process.
    Thank you so much for sharing.

    • Karen says:

      Marie, It does seem like magic to me, too, as the pattern shows up on the loom. I never tire of seeing the pattern develop with color.

      Thank you for your thoughts!
      Karen

  • Cindie says:

    I love your monk’s belt with all the color changes in both pattern and ground.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Cindie, Changing the color in the ground weave gives monksbelt a whole new dimension that I wasn’t expecting. I’ve been pleasantly surprised. I’m glad you like it!

      Karen

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