Another Small Tapestry Loom

One more little tapestry loom? I signed up for Rebecca Mezoff’s Weaving Tapestry on Little Looms online class, and ordered a Hokett loom to go with it. This petite 7″ x 8″ loom is made by Jim Hokett, who uses exotic woods for the looms. Mine is made of bubinga and chechen woods. Very pretty and nice to the touch! This is a 6-dent loom, and I have warped it double, to have 12 ends per inch.

Hockett loom warped for weaving a small tapestry.

Hokett 6-dent loom is warped 12 ends per inch by warping 2 ends per dent. I am not accustomed to using a tapestry beater or a shed stick. It will be fascinating to try some new things!

New Hokett loom - starting sample for Rebecca Mezoff's class.

I did some weaving while riding in the car. I finished the header, a short hem, and a row of special knots for the hem’s turned edge.

In this course, I am practicing some basic small loom tapestry techniques. Rebecca has a very organized, clear teaching style, so it’s a joy to learn from her. As I practice, I am reviewing things I have learned previously; and I am picking up great tips that are new to me. And, for once, lo and behold, I am weaving tapestry from the front!

May your new year start with learning something new.

Happy Year End,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Leigh Grundy says:

    I almost bought one of those little hokett looms once for sampling. They are so cute. What would you do with such a little tapestry? I can’t wait to see.

    Have a wonderful New Year.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Leigh, The little Hokett looms would be great for sampling for larger tapestries. I don’t have a specific end in mind. Sometimes I mount the small tapestry and put it in a frame. Most of the time, though, it’s an exercise for my fingers and my mind. I’m not at the point where I’m making masterpieces yet.

      Karen

  • Beth says:

    I followed Rebecca and her time spent in the Petrified Forest. I love her work and would one day like to take a class from her. The online class sounds like a great way to begin. I’m looking forward to seeing your progress.

    • Karen says:

      Beth, I follow Rebecca on Instagram. Her small tapestries from the Petrified Forest were very interesting. After seeing other students’ work on IG, I decided to go for it myself!

      Karen

  • Betsy says:

    I have put that class on my personal wish list. I got a Lost Pond hand-held loom for Christmas and I’ve never done tapestry. I will be visiting the person who gave it to me next summer; it would be nice to show her I’m using it! 🙂

    On that same trip I’m taking Basics at Vavstuga!!! :happy dance:

    • Karen says:

      Hi Betsy, Rebecca shows a Lost Pond loom in her class. It looks like a good frame loom! Vavstuga Basics!! WooHoo! You’ll love it.

      Happy Weaving!
      Karen

  • Louise Yale says:

    Also just bought a Hockett loom – in red zebra wood !! Same size as yours.

    Just experimenting with the loom now with traditional tapestry techniques and soumak which I really enjoy, Soumak stitches provide a 3 demensional accent or frame to the other stitches.
    Currently working with cotton perle but want to try silk.
    Planning to make a small flat purse for frequently used credit cards for my purse. I may add a braided necklace and wear it as a piece of textile jewelry.

    • Karen says:

      Louise, I love the wood. There is something special about holding wood in your hands that makes the tapestry work that much more interesting and special.

      I have done a little bit of soumak on this loom, too. It’s something I’d like to explore some more.
      I’d love to see what you’re making! The purse and textile jewelry sound fascinating!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

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Alpaca Warmth

Now that the fringe is finished, and the scarf has been washed, it is ready to be worn! The textural detail of this scarf is striking. An observer may not be aware that the woven pattern is that of an eight-shaft wavy (undulating) twill. But they are sure to notice the gentle drape of the long, warm scarf. The unique curvy ribbed surface is secondary.

Alpaca scarf in an eight-shaft wavy twill, with lattice fringe.

Alpaca scarf in an eight-shaft wavy twill, with lattice fringe.

I can’t think of anything more rewarding than spending time with beloved family! It’s been super sweet to be surrounded with such special adults and little children the last few days to celebrate Christmas together.

Handwoven undulating twill alpaca scarf.

Wavy twill gives the scarf a distinct textural element.

Soft, warm, and long handwoven alpaca scarf.

Celebrating Christmas joys in Texas hill country.

Handwoven long and soft alpaca scarf.

My daughter Melody models the alpaca scarf. Her husband, Eddie, is the photographer.

You are set apart to be a blessing. Let that blessing begin at home, and reach out from there. As alpaca fiber is known for its warmth and wearability, this scarf is perfect comfort for a cold winter day. May our homes, also, be known for the warmth and comfort that comes from being a place of blessing.

May you stay warm.

Merry Christmas, still,
Karen

4 Comments

  • Liberty Stickney says:

    The scarf is beautiful and looks so soft! I hope you had a wonderful time with all your family!
    Liberty

    • Karen says:

      Hi Liberty, Thanks! The scarf is fun to wear. It’s long enough to wrap around once or twice, but it’s not heavy.
      We really had a great time with family. I hope you did, too!

      Karen

  • Stunning !~! The undulating pattern mesmerizes as I look at it. And alpaca’s incredible lightness creates a jewel of a scarf. Wow. Does it get cold enough where you live for this ?

    • Karen says:

      Hi, Lynda,
      😉 It doesn’t get cold enough here very often. On those few days that it is cold enough, 2 or 3 days in the last couple weeks, I’m glad to have it around my neck.
      Karen

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Quiet Friday: Lease Sticks in Place

What is the first thing I do when I have a new warp to put on the loom? Insert lease sticks. When I wind a warp on my warping reel, the ends follow an alternating over/under pattern between two pegs. This forms an “X” in the wound warp, and keeps the warp ends in sequential order. This “X” is called the lease cross, and I use lease sticks to secure it before proceeding. Hence, the lease sticks take first priority as I begin to dress the loom. Essentially, they hold the warp together.

Dressing the loom with a linen warp.

New linen warp. As viewed from the front of the loom, two long sticks support the reed and lease sticks for pre-sleying the reed. The lease sticks are in front of the reed.

Lease sticks behind the beater. Linen warp.

As viewed from the back of the loom, the warp is under tension (from the warping trapeze). Lease sticks have been moved to position behind the beater.

Dressing Glimakra Standard loom.

Warp ends are straightened and evened out behind the lease sticks.

Beginning to beam a linen warp.

Reed is placed in the beater and centered.

Ready to begin beaming this linen warp.

Lease sticks are moved forward, to just behind the beater. Ready to begin beaming the warp!

This Christmas, remember to keep Jesus first. Jesus, the humble king, was born to die on a cross that we may live. In Him all things hold together. Joy to the world!

May your threads stay in order.

Have a Good Christmas,
Karen

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Delight of a New Warp

Warp wound onto the back beam, as seen through the beater, only adds to the expectant delight. The new warp is tied on and the treadles are tied up. The next step is to wind a quill with linen thread to put in the ready boat shuttle! This is joyous anticipation for a handweaver.

New warp on the back beam, seen through the beater.

Immanuel, God with us, Jesus Christ. He came to live among us. The one who came to save us lives among us. He delights in us, loves us, and rejoices over us. Imagine that! The Lord rejoices over you. The Grand Weaver delights in his creations. Why are we surprised?

May you be delighted and be a delight.

Merry Christmas to you,
Karen

3 Comments

  • Lynette says:

    I can identify with your joy of starting to weave a new warp! And I love your application to Jesus’ joy over us. Merry Christmas to you, too! Hope your back is feeling better.
    I’m just getting used to a “new-to-me” used Glimakra loom. I was wondering if you find that you can step on your treadles with shoes on? I need to be able to wear my shoes when I weave and am having trouble stepping on more than one treadle at a time with my shoes on. But this is only a problem when weaving a pattern requiring the middle treadles. I can step on the outer two treadles just fine for plain weave wearing shoes. Just wondering if you had this happen, and if you have a solution. Because I like a lot of things about this loom, but am seriously considering selling it because of this. It weaves 52″ wide. I’m in SW Arkansas in case you know someone who might be looking for one.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Lynette,
      You bring up an interesting dilemma. I usually have socks on to weave, and never wear shoes for weaving. Is it possible for you to try a different type of shoe? That might be easier than switching looms. A ballet-type slipper, or a moccasin of some sort would work. Another solution would be to tie up every other treadle, or tie no more than two treadles in a row, if you don’t need all the treadles.
      I’d be interested in hearing input from others who have possible solutions…

      I love the Glimakra loom, so, in my perspective, it would be worth finding a solution to make this loom work.

      Merry Christmas,
      Karen

  • Lynette says:

    Thanks so much, Karen, for your wisdom. I will try some of these options for sure. There a lot of things I like about this loom – it’s quiet, and easy to treadle even with a very tight warp. I’ve even set up some small stick “levers” at the front top of the loom that I can raise up to act as a fulcrum to move my heavy beater back on the three notches from a sitting position very easily. If anyone wants to see what they look like and how they work you can email me at meglass@gmail.com.

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Linen Coming Next

Linen warp and linen weft is a recipe for elegance. The warp chain is a pleasant sight. It’s a signal that something is going to happen, that action is in the air, that a loom is about to be dressed!

Linen warp chain.

176 ends of 16/2 Golden Bleached linen.

When I see a linen warp chain, I anticipate an exciting project. It’s a picture of work to be done–beaming, threading, sleyingtying on, and tying up. And it’s a picture of fabric to be woven. Linen brings its own challenges, I know. Careful technique and mindful practices are a must. But I’m eager get started!

Preparing to beam a linen warp.

Linen warp is placed with the lease cross just on the other side of the beater.

Advent. The word means “coming.” It’s the season we are in right now, leading up to Christmas. It signifies the world waiting for the coming of Christ. As a warp chain is a picture of anticipation and hope, so is Advent. And the coming of Jesus answers that hope. The story of Christmas is the story of God with us. Jesus, God with us still. A line from “O Little Town of Bethlehem,” an old carol written by Phillips Brooks, says it well, “O come to us, abide with us, our Lord Emmanuel!”

May your anticipation and hope be satisfied.

Blessed Christmas,
Karen

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