With or Without a Cartoon?

Weaving a transparency could become one of my favorite things to do. I had no idea that drawing a cartoon for this project would make such a difference. Now, I can see vast possibilities with this weaving technique.

Drawing a cartoon on buckram for weaving a transparency.

Buckram, a stiff cotton cloth, is in my sewing supplies, specifically for making bills on caps. It is being used here to make a cartoon for the transparency weaving. The center line will be lined up with the center warp end.

I started the transparency without a cartoon. I wanted to weave a few zigzags back and forth. How hard could that be? I counted warp ends, “under 12 to the right, and then, under 13 to the left.” When I tried to change the angle of the slant, though, it was confusing. I started getting jagged zigs and zags. This cartoon has made a world of difference.

Cartoon in pinned into place under the transparency weaving.

Cartoon is aligned and pinned into place.

Transparency weaving in progress. Cotton chenille over linen.

For each row of the pattern, the cotton chenille weft butterflies go under the raised warp ends that coincide with the lines drawn on the cartoon underneath. One pick of linen background weft follows each pattern row.

How often do we think it will be easier to go our own way? We want to make it up as we go. Wait. There’s a better way. The head designer has drawn out a path. It makes sense to follow those lines. It’s a picture that’s bigger than we are. God created. He did it in such a way that shows his loving attention to those he created. And we get to follow his design. No more striving. No more trying to find our way. His way makes perfect sense. It’s satisfying to place the weft in a thought-out design.

May you see the possibilities.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

6 Comments

  • Hi Karen, What a wonderful comparison to our walk with God! Yes, it is very satisfying to me also to weave transparencies. The design emerges one row at a time, and when it’s time to stop and do something else, I say “just one more row”… Glad you are having the enjoyment of following a cartoon. The fabric you print yours on is a neat idea. I have also used stiff Pellon for mine, sometimes it is also thin enough that I can trace a design through it.
    All the best,
    Lynette

    • Karen says:

      Hi Lynette,
      “Just one more row…” Yes, that’s exactly what I’ve been saying!
      Your behind-the-scenes encouragement and details have inspired me. I can’t thank you enough!
      When I need to trace a picture I will get some thinner pellon, like you do. Since I had some buckram on my shelf I thought I’d try it, and it’s working out great.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Phyllis says:

    Just found your blog! I am thankful, inspired and blessed! Newer weaver here.

  • Pam says:

    Hi, Karen,
    I am a student at a University. In the course of studying weaving, trying to place a cartoon under the warp has been a challenge to all who want to make a tapestry. We’ve tried various ideas and none too successful. I’ve used buckram to repair books, but never considered using it in weaving. Thanks for the great suggestion. I’m going to share this with my fellow class mates. Pam

    • Karen says:

      Hi Pam,
      How exciting to get to study weaving in a university setting! I am delighted that my serendipitous discovery gives you and your classmates something to try. Let me know how the buckram works for you!

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

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