What a Web We Weave

Threading errors happen. But you can reduce their occurrence. After beaming a warp, I count the warp ends into threading groups before I start threading. Always. This is the first step in reducing threading errors.

Beamed linen warp. Tied into threading groups.

Beamed linen warp. Ends are counted into threading groups, and tied in loose slip knots.

The second step in nearly eliminating threading errors is to check every threaded group right after it’s threaded, thread by thread. These intentional steps expose mistakes early in the process. I would rather find an error now than later.

Threading ten shafts.

After a group of warp ends is threaded I check every thread to make sure it is on the correct shaft.

Threading ten shafts. How to avoid errors.

View from the back beam. Every thread is now in its proper place. Two ends had ended up on wrong shafts, so threads were taken back out and corrections made. Threading ten shafts can get confusing, so it is critical that I check my work.

Did the spider check for threading errors before weaving her intricate pattern? Did she know her invisible web could be seen on a dew-rich foggy morning?

Napping spider on her almost invisible web.

Napping spider on her almost invisible web.

Spider's web in dew-rich foggy morning.

Early morning dew reveals the outlines of the spider’s web. Not wanting to be seen, the spider quickly climbs away to hide when I come close to her woven threads.

Our world tells us to make enemies, and hate haters. To grip what is mine, and demand my rights. It’s in my human nature to be that way. But love is different. Love your enemy, do good instead of hate, pray for those who mistreat you. Is that possible? Yes, if you know the love of God firsthand. Love makes you different. It changes you, making you want to take account of your attitudes, and check your motives. Count threading groups, and check the threading. There will be errors as you weave, but they are learning experiences, not fights. Remember, the invisible web we weave may not be as invisible as we think.

May you be different.

With love,
Karen

4 Comments

  • Annie says:

    Good morning, Karen!

    I have never seen ten shafts threaded before. The first thing that came to mind was “This must have been the inspiration for Shakespeare’s line “Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive.” The play it appears in is escaping me for the moment. In comparing the spider web to the one on your loom, the spider web seems rather simple!

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts this morning. Have a wonderful day and weekend.

    Annie

    • Karen says:

      Hi Annie,
      Shakespeare’s quote is certainly on target.

      I watched the spider start weaving her web a couple weeks ago. Very meticulous and precise, it seemed. So fascinating! It’s amazing how something so fragile can be so strong. As far as simple? Yes, mine is considerably more complicated…and will last a bit longer, too.

      Thanks for chiming in! I enjoy hearing your thoughts!
      Karen

  • Cat Wycliff says:

    What a lovely way to describe how love makes us different. And your practical ideas on re-threading and checking it twice deserve to often be repeated. I need to remind myself of your patient practice.

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