Casita Tapestry

As Steve and I sign off little by little from activities and responsibilities here in Houston, the taste is bittersweet. Bitter, because moving away from time-tested friends is heart wrenching. Sweet, because an unknown exciting adventure awaits. Bitter, because unknown is uncomfortable. Sweet, because heart-connected friendships are treasures that distance can’t destroy. Bittersweet, but not bitter-ness, or sugary-sweet pretense. It’s life. Texas hill country living and Casita adventures are less than a month away! It’s all good.

Tapestry of our Casita travel trailer.

We are naming our Casita travel trailer “La Perlita” – (“Little Pearl”).

Glimakra Freja tapestry frame. Expressive tapestry weaving.

Large Glimåkra Freja tapestry frame and expressive tapestry weaving.

Tapestry of our new Casita.

Adventures are coming soon…
We will pick up our new little pearl the day after Steve retires and pull it to our hill country home.

May you have friends by your side when you face bittersweet seasons.

All the best,
Karen

14 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    What an exciting time for you and your husband. I hope your long-standing friends visit you in the Hill Country; something exciting for them. Wishing you all the best!

  • susie weitzel says:

    Our guild is holding a mini workshop on tapestry weaving in January. After seeing your tapestry weavings I am so anxious to try something new !! Not that I need anything new to add to my already long list. LOL.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Susie, Don’t think of it as adding something new, haha. It’s still in the realm of weaving, isn’t it? You never know, you may find out tapestry becomes your favorite thing to do. At the very least, with a frame loom it gives you the option of portability so you can weave wherever you are. 🙂
      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Blend, blend, blend, … Surprise, solid black wheels. Nice.

    Transition, gotta roll with it.

    First snow of the season came this morning. The background went from golds and browns to white. Gardening season is over. Weaving begins.

    Blessings.

    Nannette

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, I’m pleased that you took notice of the black wheel. I like the way it stands out.

      I’m thankful for seasons.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Linda Adamson says:

    New adventures can be exciting. If God has called you to go then you will be following his will. Blessings and safe travels!

  • Cynthia says:

    New adventures. I love it. I for one am one of the ppl Steve has invited, So be looking for me! He will be greatly missed here.

  • Lyna says:

    How long do it take to drive between Houston and your Hill Country home? What is your closest big city now? The Wikipedia article about Texas Hill Country says it covers 25 counties. Sounds interesting to explore!

    • Karen says:

      Hi, Lyna, It takes us about 4 1/2 hours to drive from Houston to our place in Hill Country. The town nearest us is Kerrville, and we are not far from Fredericksburg. And we’re only an hour from San Antonio. There are many beautiful and interesting places to explore in Texas Hill Country. Be sure to stop by if you’re in the area!

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Donna says:

    I’m in Bandera. Must be fairly close. There’s also a wonderful town called Comfort. Awesome, but sometimes expensive antique stores

    • Karen says:

      Hi Donna, Bandera! That’s right around the corner. We should get together sometime.

      I’ve been to Comfort a couple times, too. It’s a charming little town. One great thing about Comfort is it has a weaving shop – The Loom Room.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

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Heart of a Tiny Tapestry

Though small, this pocket-sized tapestry took a few months to complete. A car ride here, a coffee shop there, a move across town, and an imminent move across the state—this tiny tapestry has been in the background through it all.

Car-ride weaving.

Car-ride weaving.

Coffee-shop weaving.

Coffee-shop weaving.

The weft tails are neatly trimmed, but the back is completely exposed. I’m not weaving the tails in this time, nor covering them with a fabric backing. Just hold the tiny tapestry in your hand and feel it. Remember that all the pleasant color distinctions and pick-and-pick samples on the front side have a back side, too. True, the back doesn’t make as much sense. However, I want my friend who is receiving this to see and touch the heart of the weaving.

Finishing ends of small tapestry.

Using a needle to pull the warp ends back through the warp thread header. After pulling through, the warp ends are trimmed close to the surface. The weft tails are also trimmed to about 1/2″.

Steaming the tiny tapestry. 12/6 cotton warp pulls together nicely as the back of the tapestry is steamed.

Exposed back of the tiny tapestry weaving reveals trimmed weft tails.

Exposed back of the tapestry reveals trimmed weft tails.

Tiny tapestry. Visual and tactile satisfaction.

Visual and tactile satisfaction.

This is a picture of grace. Look at the heart of the matter. We so often rely on the rules. Break a rule, and you’re condemned. But Jesus is interested in the heart. A pure heart doesn’t stand condemned. This is why the gift of his forgiveness is so wonderful. God knows the exposed messy side of our tapestry. Yet, his grace sees us as perfectly covered by Christ Jesus himself.

May your hands keep making.

Simply yours,
Karen

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Weaving La Perlita

One reason I am making friends with this large Freja tapestry frame is Steve’s quickly advancing retirement date. The day after his final work day we are picking up La Perlita, our new Casita travel trailer. We are looking forward to some fun times. Steve will have his carving knives for whittling. And I’ll have my loom. And yarn. What more could we ask for?

Making a tapestry cartoon.

For the cartoon, I enlarged the picture from the Casita brochure, and then drew my own background around it.

Tapestry of our new Casita - "La Perlita."

Home again, after staying with and playing with my young grandsons. The weaving represents a week’s worth of naps.

Tapestry of our new Casita travel trailer!

Using technique similar to the four-shaft tapestry on my Glimakra Ideal loom. This gives me a chance to add more depth and texture to the tapestry image. With this technique, some warp does show.

May you have something to look forward to.

Happy weaving,
Karen

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Weave Every Day

I like to weave every day. At least a little bit.

This week, though, I have more important things to do, like playing outside and having pillow pallet parties with grandsons. Do you know how demanding full time motherhood is? I’ve done it, but that was eons ago. Diaper changes, giggles and tears, and squabbling. And forgetting.

Outside

Pillow pallet party

Read with me!

At the park

Way up high

But I did get my big Glimåkra Freja tapestry frame warped…And a header woven…And I wove the first few picks of the tapestry. That’s what nap times are good for.

Tapestry frame

Tapestry frame

Tapestry frame

Little children quickly forget the offense that started a squabble. After nap time, they’re off, giggling together again. Forgiveness forgets. Have you ever had a squabble with God? We’ve all been there. When God forgave us he smudged out the long list of all our offenses. And then he nailed it to the cross of Christ, our squabbles forever forgotten. And in the resulting quiet that’s like a restful nap time, our Lord weaves his image in us.

May your squabbles be few.

Forgiven,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Joyce Lowder says:

    Beautifully said! Our Lord IS amazing! His Grace cleans the slate and allows us to know real Peace! 🙂

  • Ruth says:

    Karen, Thank you for your timely words. It is so good to read your insightful statements about your faith and reflect on how it echos in my life. Blessings to you and your family as you enjoy your time together.

  • Linda Cornell says:

    Beautiful grandchildren! We have three little ones and their mommy and daddy living with us for a time. Blessings and God’s opportunity to work in me and them. The weaving project on the loom is going slowly but surely. Perhaps this is how God works in us too.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Linda, I do think God works in us in almost imperceptible ways. Often, we don’t realize it until we look back and see the difference.

      Thanks,
      Karen

  • Liberty says:

    Hi Karen,
    I would have also just played with those cute little pumpkins! Grandkids are the best!!
    Thank goodness we are forgiven, I especially am grateful.
    Liberty

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Lizard Tapestry Disruption

I started the Lizard tapestry right before our big disruption. Selling your house means that every in-process project instantly becomes vulnerable. Yikes! After a sleepless night, I contacted my friend Joanne Hall. Can this weaving be saved? Yes!, she assured me, as she gave me instructions for dismantling the loom.

Getting ready to dismantle loom for relocation.

Yarn supply is packed up, including all the wool butterflies.

Getting ready to dismantle loom for moving.

Cartoon is removed.

Everything is logical about the process. Undo things, tie parts together, take things apart. And I don’t have to cut off the weaving? No. Remove the beam cords from the cloth beam. It’s that simple.

Lamms and treadles removed for moving the loom.

Lamms and treadles have been taken off.

Moving a loom without ruining a tapestry in progress!

Beam cords are removed from the cloth beam.

Removing the warp beam. Relocating the loom.

Steve unscrews a bolster that holds one side of the warp beam so I can remove the warp beam.

Warp beam removed! Hope to put this back together.

Holding the precious bundle!

Taking the loom apart.

Taken apart. Tapestry, reed, and shafts are rolled and bundled up in the fish beach towel.

Now all I have to do is wait

Relocating my loom.

Everything fits in the car, ready for transport.

All the dust has settled, the house transaction is done, and the loom has been re-located and put back together. It’s the first thing you see when you enter our ground-floor apartment.

Getting ready to re-assemble loom.

New location for the loom is in the living room of our apartment.

Simple Swedish loom assembling.

Simple Swedish loom assembling.

Re-assembling my loom after relocating.

Re-attaching the bolster to hold the warp beam.

Re-assembling loom after relocating.

Tapestry in view.

Using a spare heddle as a cord threader.

Spare Texsolv heddle works as a cord threader (I forgot to pack the “real” cord threader) to re-attach the cords on the cloth beam.

What about the Lizard? Can I resume where I left off? Good news: IT WORKED!

Ready to weave after relocating the loom!

Everything is put back together. Beam cords are re-attached. Yarn is unpacked. Warp is tensioned.

Lizard four-shaft tapestry.

Lizard foot grips the breast beam as weaving resumes!

When have you had to wait? Something you dearly long for is unreachable for a while. Waiting for the Lord is always waiting with hope. I trusted my friend’s advice. So, my hope was strong while I waited to see this lizard take shape again. In a similar way, I can trust the Lord when there is a disruption. Wait with strong hope. Wait for the grace to begin again.

May you wait patiently.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

12 Comments

  • Kay Larson says:

    It looks like your move went pretty smoothly. Your tapestry looks so fun. I look forward to seeing completed. I treasure your posts.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Kay, It didn’t feel smooth while we were in the midst of it all, but now that things are relatively quiet again, I guess you’re right— It did go pretty smoothly.

      This tapestry is fun indeed. I’m looking forward to long uninterrupted sessions to enjoy it!

      Thank you for your sweet words.
      Karen

  • Beth Mullins says:

    So glad this worked out for you!

  • Betsy says:

    Joanne is such a help! I took my Julia from TX to WI for a workshop last May and went through the same process using her instructions. At least I didn’t have to worry about a project, just the header had been woven. The Julia gables come apart, so everything fit in a box except the back uprights. So cool.

    I will be looking forward to seeing that lizard emerge further.

    • Karen says:

      Betsy, Sounds like the Julia is a perfect workshop loom! Joanne has a wealth of knowledge and experience. It’s sweet that she is so willing to help.

      This lizard is going to get a lot of my attention in the next few weeks.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Good morning.
    I set up my new to me home made floor loom at a weekend house. There was 12″ of my first project on it when we decided to sell that house and look for our future retirement home. As it was dismantled each connection was marked with the same number using a sharpie. When it was put back back together 1 was matched up with 1… and so on. Now it is set up to dismantle and take anywhere.

    The people who designed looms were remarkable inspired.

    Blessings to all.

    Nannette

  • Annie says:

    I love the advice to “Wait with strong hope.” There are times when that advice is sorely needed.

    I, also, look forward to hearing about your adventures, Karen. And this one was a big one! It is a good thing that your apartment has a large living room!

    May you enjoy your temporary home.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Annnie, I, too, often need a reminder to wait with strong hope. When things are difficult, hope can begin to waver.

      I don’t know if I would say this apartment has a large living room. The loom takes up a pretty good chunk of it. Fortunately, the room is large enough. 🙂

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Barb says:

    Thank you for for your posts, I have learned so much by reading them. And right now, just what I needed to deal with my own transitions. All the decisions and disruptions related to remodeling, selling a loom, and buying a new loom have been weighing me down. I have my eyes on a used Glimakra Standard, but it’s 1,800 miles away….. The pictures of moving your loom have been very helpful. Perfectly put, I can now wait with strong hope.

    I’m happy that your move has gone so well & you are temporarily settled.

    Thank you!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Barb, I do understand the impact of life transitions. It can be stressful when you’re in the middle of it!

      I’m glad to hear that you are holding onto strong hope. Remember, just about everything is temporary.

      Hugs,
      Karen

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