Travel Blessings

My adventure to Germany and Austria with my sister was incredible! Many firsts and many blessings. First time to visit Europe. First castle, first currywurst, first German symphony, first hike in the Alps, first Austrian apfelstrudel, first close-up mountain waterfall. And many, many more wonders, delights, and amazements. Any weaving? We visited a handweaving museum in Germany. And I did some occasional tapestry weaving in the evenings. The best tapestry times happened while sitting out on the balcony at our room in Innsbruck.

Weberplatz of Babelsberg, Germany.
Weberplatz of Babelsberg. These were weavers quarters in days gone by.
We had a picnic lunch on the castle steps.
We had a picnic lunch on the castle steps.
Weaving an image from Big Bend State Park, Texas, while enjoying the balcony view in Innsbruck, Austria.
Weaving an image from Big Bend State Park, Texas, while enjoying the balcony view in Innsbruck, Austria.

Be open for blessings. Look for blessings. I don’t mean life should be easy, conflict free, or always comfortable. The blessings are often hidden in long hours, tired feet, and foreign words. Be ready for the best lessons the Creator has for you. The Lord’s faithfulness is stamped into the gardens, mountain peaks, and waterfalls. His glory is written on every face, voice, and pair of hands. His blessings are tucked into secret places, awaiting our delighted discoveries. Live blessed.

May you be surrounded with blessings.

Your Wandering Weaver,
Karen

10 Comments

  • Joyce Lowder says:

    Thanks for sharing your journey and I’m glad you had a special time/memories with your sister. Your tapestry is looking very good! Blessing to you! 🙂

  • laura says:

    Thanks for sharing all those beautiful pictures. So much inspiration that nature and the older buildings have to offer. Thanks again, enjoy the rest of your trip.
    I have one question, what type of loom are you weaving on? So cute and compact.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Laura, You are right about the inspiration from nature and the older buildings. I was constantly thinking in design terms as I viewed the various patterns and colors. I hope some of that comes out in future weaving projects.

      The little frame loom is one that my husband Steve made for me. I also have the Glimakra Freja frame looms that I really like to use. This handmade one is a little more portable for traveling.

      It’s good to be home,
      Karen

  • Beth says:

    Sounds like a fabulous time! You’re so fortunate to have a sister who’s also a friend. Thank you for sharing!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Beth, I am blessed to have two sisters who are dear friends. And so grateful to have these adventures with one of them!

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Annie says:

    Thank you for sharing all of your firsts with us, Karen!

    The tapestry is looking amazing. Quite the counterpoint of wide open spaces of nature to the view of crowded man made buildings of Innsbruck.

    Safe travels!

    • Karen says:

      Hi dear Annie, What a wonderful way to express the juxtaposition of the small tapestry with the view over the balcony!

      “Quite the counterpoint of wide open spaces of nature to the view of crowded man made buildings of Innsbruck.”

      Perfect description. And sometimes it’s a blessing to leave the wide open spaces in nature for Nachittag (afternoon) Kaffe und Kuchen at a cafe in crowded Innsbruck.

      Thank you!
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Welcome back Karen,
    Weberplatz of Babelsberg is that where the you found those ancient looms in the video? I’d love to see more detail, if you have it.

    Your tapestry is coming along quickly. I look forward to it’s finish.

    May God be with you.

    • Karen says:

      Thank you, Nannette,

      The old looms were in the Handwebereimuseum in Geltow, Germany. They were fascinating. Most were 47-53 cm weaving width, and all with fly shuttles. The back beams were up high at the back of the looms, and they were all countermarch looms as far as I could tell. There were no English signs or explanations, so I just looked and enjoyed. I did not take a lot of pictures there.

      Here is a link of one of my Instagram posts with a video of a demonstration at the museum: Weaving demo.
      All the best,
      Karen

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En Plein Air Weaving

It is delightful to weave in scenic surroundings! After two full days of hiking and exploring remote vistas in Big Bend Ranch State Park we had a leisurely do-nothing day. Time to take the loom outdoors. En plein air weaving!

Casita in Maverick Ranch RV Park at the base of Lajitas Mesa.
Our campsite is at the base of Lajitas Mesa.
Big Bend Ranch State Park, Texas.
Hiking the Fresno Divide Trail in Big Bend Ranch State Park in west Texas.
Mountainous view in the desert of Big Bend Ranch State Park, Texas.
Mountainous views in the desert.
Fresno Canyon in Big Bend State Park, Texas.
Fresno Canyon vista, with the mountains of Mexico in the distance.
En plein air tapestry weaving by the Casita travel trailer.
En plein air tapestry weaving during a leisurely morning. Camera tripod cover doubles as a loom topper that prevents the loom from scratching the Casita.
Casita Travel Trailer - tapestry in progress!
Wool yarn for the Casita tapestry is wound on labeled cards and kept in spare Tupperware Modular Mate containers.

We also went exploring in Big Bend National Park.

Hiking the Santa Elena Canyon in Big Bend National Park.
Hiking in Santa Elena Canyon, with Mexico to my left and USA on my right. And the Rio Grande River in between.
Santa Elena Canyon in Big Bend National Park.
Santa Elena Canyon in Big Bend National Park, the least visited National Park in the United States.

And then, I like to wind down the day with some quiet evening tapestry weaving in the Casita. And Steve pulls out his travel pouch for some leisurely woodcarving. Ah…all is well.

Tapestry weaving of our Casita Travel Trailer.
Ending the day with some quiet tapestry weaving.

May you find delight in your surroundings.

Happy adventuring,
Karen

14 Comments

  • Nannette says:

    Just when I think God’s world cannot possibly be more beautiful, surprise! Wow, oh wow!

    Nannette

  • Beth says:

    What a treat for you! Thank you for sharing photos of this part of our country. It’s breathtaking!

  • Lynn says:

    Love the photos and seeing what you are doing – thanks for sharing!

  • Annette says:

    Big Bend National Park has been on my bucket list for years. I am so glad that you are adventuring there, Karen. At least I get to enjoy it vicariously.

    You have a definite talent for tapestry weaving! I have yet to try that, also. Although I purchased a tapestry weaving book about a year thinking that I would like to try that,too, someday. For now I will just enjoy my bucket list vicariously with you. Keep posting, Karen!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Annie, I hope you do make it out to Big Bend! It’s definitely worth the drive.

      Thank you for your encouraging words about my tapestry weaving. I don’t feel very confident in that area. I like doing it, though, so I keep trying.
      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Joanna says:

    Hi Karen,

    What a great way to retire! Exploring more of Texas is on my list. We made a trip to the hill country a couple of years ago and I thought I could surely give up my die-hard Yankee status.

    May I ask what your warp and weft are, and approximate sett? Your tapestries are wonderful, don’t sell yourself short. The emotion and character of the subject/setting come through quite powerfully.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joanna, When you make it back to the hill country, be sure to come by for a visit!

      The warp is 12/6 cotton rug warp; the sett is about 10 epi. I have 16/1 linen weft that alternates with the wool pattern weft. Most of the weft is 2 or 3 strands of wool – 6/2 Tuna and 6/1 Fårö wool, but there are a few other odds and ends mixed in.

      I appreciate your kind thoughts so much! My intent is to present expressive tapestry weaving, and it sounds like that is what comes across to you.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Joanna says:

    Thanks for your reply. My hubby gave me a Mirrix Big Sister and I want to be sensible about the sett.
    Your portrait of your granddaughter was so loving and the funny little gecko made me laugh every time I got a glimpse.

    Thanks for the invitation. Same goes for you if you’re up in Colorado.

  • Linda says:

    Seeing your frame loom reminds me of days gone by.

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