Three Rosepath Rag Rugs For Now

There are three completed rosepath rag rugs on the loom, with warp remaining for at least one more rug. Since I don’t know how soon I will be able to weave the remainder, cutting off the completed rugs makes sense. After hemming, I will have three new rugs for Etsy. (Don’t miss the new Quick Tip video at the end of this post!)

Cutting off rosepath rag rugs, with some warp remaining to be woven.

As the warp ends are cut, they are tied into one-inch groupings to simplify tying back on to the tie-on bar.

Unrolling some new rosepath rag rugs!

Warping slats are used as spacers between rugs. Some of my slats are barely wide enough for this warp.

I look forward to full weaving days again, with both looms dressed, and shuttles zooming. That rag rug warp still on the loom will be a reward worth waiting for.

Rosepath rag rug ready to be hemmed. Karen Isenhower

One rug has warp end knots, and is ready for pressing and hemming.

Two rosepath rag rugs just off the loom. Karen Isenhower

Rosepath in two variations.

Rosepath rag rug ready to be hemmed. Karen Isenhower

Broad rosepath pattern lends elegance to this rag rug.

Last week, when I awoke from surgery, the relentless pain I had been experiencing in my left leg and lower back was gone. Completely gone! It made me think of heaven. Ancient writings tell us that the lame will leap like a deer, and that sorrow and sighing will flee away. There’s no place for pain in heaven. All the people there have been healed and restored. That’s a reward worth waiting for. And I won’t be surprised if there are at least a few in heaven who are weaving away to their heart’s content.

May you know what to do while waiting.

Wishing you well,
Karen

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More Rosepath Rag Rug Ideas

This is my favorite rosepath rag rug of all time! (Have I said that before?) I like the unexpected color changes that occur in the design. While the main rosepath pattern is woven in a yellow batik, the background tabby changes from pink to a mixed print, and then a single brown stripe outlining solid blue.

Classic rosepath motif in a rag rug on the loom.

Single row of dark brown tabby serves to outline the central rosepath motif.

The other thing I like about this design is the repeated uneven plain weave weft stripes–three rows green and two rows black. The ideas for color changes and uneven stripes came from looking at rugs in my Swedish weaving books. I have another rug to weave on this warp before we get to see this “favorite” spread out on the floor.

Weaving a rosepath rag rug. So many design possibilities!

Every weft, including the rosepath pattern weft, goes around the selvedge warp ends. The inactive yellow batik fabric strip is carried up the selvedge through the active wefts.

Designs start with ideas. Who designed the intricate workings of the human body, or had the idea of putting planets together in a solar system? The universe is amazing, with every explicit detail honoring the Creator. Designed to operate on the faithful love of the Lord, this universe is a divine idea brought to life. With the glimpses we see of his perfect design, we can’t help but give our Grand Weaver the admiration he deserves.

May you have plenty of favorites to weave.

Happy weaving,
Karen

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Tools Day: Loom Bench Baskets

Some accessories are so useful they simply become an extension of the loom. That’s how my loom bench baskets are for me. I automatically place an emptied shuttle there without a second thought. It’s where extra shuttles go that are waiting their turn, or extra quills that have been wound, or a few fabric strips that are set aside for one section. For anything I need to drop or pick up–the baskets are always there.

Loom bench basket holds the ski shuttles for a rosepath rag rug.

Deep basket on the bench at the baby loom (Glimakra Ideal) easily holds my ski shuttles for this rosepath rag rug.

Loom bench basket holds the 5 ski shuttles for this rosepath rag rug.

Leather strap on the basket slips over the end post of my loom bench, right by the always-handy measuring tape.

Deep basket, perfect for holding shuttles.

Basket made for this purpose, from Vavstuga.

Loom bench basket with Ikea container inserted to hold quills.

Basket at the big loom (Glimakra Standard) holds a small hanging cup I found at Ikea that is useful for holding small things, like filled and emptied quills.

Loom basket is tied to the bench with an old inkle-woven band.

Old basket I’ve had for years is put to use on the other side of the big loom bench. I tied it on with a wool inkle band I wove many years ago.

May you have what you need at your fingertips.

Happy weaving,
Karen

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How Is Your Stash?

My rag rugs start with leftovers. It is a great place to begin. By leftovers, I mean fabric strips that are left from previous projects. Unlike many traditional rag rugs that are made from recycled fabrics, I use all new cotton yardage for my rag rugs. I only buy more fabric when my supply starts to run low, or when I need a specific color that I don’t have in my supply. That’s the difference between a stash and a supply. A stash is for keeping and admiring. A supply is for using up with a purpose. A stash grows without limits. A supply is replenished in relation to the need.

Planning a rosepath rag rug.

Planning session for a new rosepath rag rug. After gathering a selection of fabrics, I snip fragments to tape to my working chart.

Rosepath rag rug on the loom.

After several plain weave stripes, the rosepath pattern is taking shape on the loom.

I have to be careful about treating my things, my time, and my ideas as my stash. For me to keep and admire. It’s better to be a giver. The generous have an endless supply. They never wonder about having “enough.” Generosity is a virtue. Those who are enriched by God can always be generous, since he is faithful to replenish the supply.

May you always have enough.

For you,
Karen

4 Comments

  • Fawn Carlsen says:

    Thank you very much for explaining stash and supply. I have too much stash which never gets used. I am afraid that I will run out. But I have made a big change. I no longer have a stash, only a supply. I will allow myself to use what I have and love doing it. Then if I need more, I will get more. But not until I need to. Your post entirely changed my attitude. I am happier now.

    • Karen says:

      Dear Fawn, It is so sweet for you to take the time to tell me these words made a difference for you! I think we all struggle with stash vs. supply mindset. Making a decision, though, like you did, is a powerful thing in turning the corner! Way to go!

      Love,
      Karen

  • I hope you don’t mind that I shared your wise words today on Facebook, along with a link to this post. We truly are blessed when we share our abundance.
    Jenny B

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Quality Rag Rugs

Does this color enhance or detract? Is there enough contrast between background and pattern? Is five centimeters of plain weave between pattern sections too long, or too short? I ask myself questions as I weave a new design. I consider all the technical aspects, as well. Warp tension, treadling finesse, and shuttle shuffling. Attention to detail matters.

Rosepath rag rug on the loom. Karen Isenhower

Design elements are planned before weaving, and then adjusted as weaving progresses on the loom.

Details begin in the planning stage with design, choice of materials, and colors. While weaving rosepath rag rugs, consistency counts. I aim for a consistently firm beat and good, tight selvedges. All of these elements contribute to quality. And as I grow in my weaving skills, overall quality improves.

Rosepath rag rugs require extra attention at the selvedges.

Rosepath rag rugs require extra attention at the selvedges.

Rosepath rag rug on the loom.

Yellow dash is made with a single weft pick. The single fabric strip is cut long enough to securely tuck the ends back into the shed.

A person’s character is defined by their motivations. It’s not what you do, but why you do it. It is not enough to look good. I can buy a cheap rug that looks good. But if I could examine how it was made, I might find the shortcuts that diminished its quality. Our inward motivations are revealed in our outward behaviors. The cheap rug fades and comes apart all too quickly. By examining our own motives we build quality of character. The result is not only lovely, but durable, too.

May your quality control efforts succeed.

With you,
Karen

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  • i just love reading your blog posts and following what you are up to! You inspire me to weave more my friend! Have a most beautiful day! I love your quote about a person’s character being defined by their motivations. I know I weave because it completes me, I love it and I see you do too!

  • linda says:

    Often a project changes when seen on the loom. Spacing of pattern and negative morphs into, for that project, a perfectness that was not planned. When I weave, Quilt, knit, or sew hand woven I stand back and revise. Very much like life. What we start out planning to do at 20 years old morphs into what we’ve done by 60. ENJOY the journey; we only have one. LP&J, linda

    • Karen says:

      Linda, So true! You give a great description of how we make revisions through life’s turns and tangles. And to enjoy the journey is a great way to live!

      Karen

  • Just wondering if you use a floating selvage on your rose path rugs. I’ve seen that recommended in some books. Thanks.

    • Karen says:

      I do not use floating selvedges for rosepath rag rugs. I prefer to take the weft on the ski shuttle over or under the outer ends as needed. The important thing is to catch every outer warp end – with floating selvedges, or by manipulating the outer warp end as needed. I explained the way I do it in point 1. in Rag Rug Selvedges Made Easy.

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

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