Tied On and Tied Up

Our transition to Texas hill country is finalized this week! The looms and I will be residing in the same house again. Let the weaving resume! One loom is dressed and waiting for me. Tied on above, and tied up below. Ready to weave!

The warp is tied on to the front tie-on bar in 1-inch bundles, with 1/2-inch bundles at the selvedges. And then, I add the leveling string which makes it look neat and tidy and READY.

Leveling string flattens and evens out the warp for no-waste weaving.

Warp is tied on to the front tie-on bar. Leveling string flattens and evens out the warp for no-waste weaving.

The upper and lower lamms are positioned, and the treadle cords are added and secured. It’s fascinating how simple and basic the whole system is. And how something this simple and basic can be the framework for boundless creative expression.

Under the warp. Intriguing view.

I sit on the treadle beam when I position the lamms, and then place the treadle cords in their holes. I’m always intrigued by the view of the warp and heddles from this vantage point.

Treadle cords on eight shafts.

Treadle tie-ups don’t frighten me. It all makes sense, and is part of the loom-dressing process that I enjoy.

If we think of prayer as something that gets us out of a crisis, or words to say in order to get what we want from God, we miss the whole point of prayer. And we face disappointment. Prayer always works. The work is not our clever words, nor the checking off of our wish list. Prayer is the framework of deep trust that stands ready for the Lord’s boundless creative expression. We pray because we trust him. Christmas—the birth of Christ—shows us that God always steps in at the right time.

May your framework be sure.

Advent greetings,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Sue Hommel says:

    Beautiful words to awaken to this morning Karen! I’ve recently added a countermarch to my studio, and I believe your blog and joy with your Glimakra helped me in my quest for the right loom to add. I chose the Julia and after some panic at the prospect of having to build it, I just took one step…then the next, and finally, I’m weaving and loving its simplicity and design. Looking forward to see what your new warp will become!

    • Karen says:

      Good morning Sue, How exciting! The simple beauty and functionality of these looms make them a joy to weave on. They also provide a constant learning experience, which is a good thing. There’s always a discovery just ahead!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Susan San Martin says:

    I love my Toika countermarche for the same reason: simplicity, plus an endless opportunity to adjust the loom . It is easy to understand how to fiddle with the sticks after awhile. The loom expresses the deep logic of creation!

  • Anneloes says:

    “Prayer is the framework of deep trust that stands ready for the Lord’s boundless creative expression. ”

    Would you believe that this was the exact thing I’ve been praying over these last few days? Beautifully written.

    Before I started weaving, I thought dressing the loom would be a tiresome process to rush through in order to dtart the REAL weaving. But it turned out to be my most favourite part of weaving, and every bit as real.

    Thank you again for your beautiful words and pictures.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Anneloes, I’m constantly amazed at how the Lord ties things together for us!

      I can relate. I was afraid that dressing the loom would be too complicated or difficult to do. What a pleasant surprise to find it so rewarding and not hard at all! It’s a joy.

      I appreciate your thoughtful comments.
      Karen

  • Martha Winters says:

    Hello, Karen,
    I have learned so much about weaving, and how it relates to life, from your blog. Thank you for sharing your insights and reflections so freely and beautifully.
    I would love to know a bit more about the ‘leveling string’ at the start of your warp. I’m not familiar with this and it looks quite useful for evening out the threads from the get-go. Much appreciation for your knowledge and awesome weaving!!

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Kuvikas and Taqueté

Kuvikas and taqueté. There are always new things to try. I’m back to eight shafts. This Glimåkra loom is highly adaptable. It is no problem to set up the loom for a new project. You may have guessed that I like to switch it up. Four shafts or eight shafts, two treadles or ten. And, change the tie-up, too. I don’t mind. With this project, I am going to change the treadle tie-up again at the midway point, switching from kuvikas to taqueté.

Threading eight shafts on my Glimakra Standard loom.

Threading eight shafts. Four pairs of shaft bars have been added to switch from a four-shaft project to an eight-shaft project. Four additional upper lamms and lower lamms have also been added to the loom.

If you know and practice the basics, it’s not frightening to try new weave structures. Every new experience builds on what I’ve learned before. I can trust the system of weaving that I’ve been taught, and that I practice with every project. It makes sense.

Aquamarine cotton. Threading my Glimakra Standard loom.

After the warp is beamed, the warp ends are tied with an overhand knot into groups, according to the threading pattern. In this case, 48 ends are in each group. Counting the ends into groups helps eliminate, or at least reduce, threading errors.

Threading eight shafts for kuvikas and taqueté.

Complex, but not complicated. Warp ends are inserted into specific heddles to set up the loom for a particular type of cloth. Very systematic.

Don’t be afraid. The Lord not only teaches us his ways–his system, but offers us his strength while we learn. I can trust him for that. Trust replaces fear. I don’t have to find my own way, or guess. The system works. It makes sense. I learn to weave, and live, one step at a time, with freedom to enjoy the process.

May you rise above your fears.

All the best,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Shirley says:

    Hi Karen, I just love the colour. Can`t wait to see what it becomes. Have fun with it.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Shirley, I had this color left from another project where I used it for narrow stripes. I wasn’t sure how I would like it all by itself. So far, I’m loving it. I can hardly wait to cross it with weft!

      Thanks,
      Karen

  • Hi Karen,
    My Glimakra has four shafts right now. I wonder how hard it would be to buy the wood pieces the right thickness and cut them to the right sizes to add four more. I have a drill press for making the holes. I just warped mine with linen for a transparency. It’s the first time I’ve done it on this loom with the trapeze. I did 10″ bouts (3) of linen, but discovered that was a bit wide for linen. With linen, I think I’ll make my bouts 4-5″ max. next time, and then the tension will be better. Just wondering if you have experienced that with linen?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Lynette, I’m going to send you an email to tell you specifics on how my husband made additional shafts for my Glimakra Ideal loom.

      I had that exact issue with my linen bouts when I warped for the transparency. It ended up not affecting the warp tension overall – at least, I never noticed a problem while weaving. But I thought about doing smaller bouts next time. My usual rule of thumb is to stay around or under 200 threads or 10″.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • JANET PELL says:

    Dear Karen, Thank you for your blogs, I am so in awe of your bravery for ‘going forth’, I love the color of your warp and cannot wait to see your project. How I wish I had your knowledge and experience. But your encouragement to everyone is a blessing for me. Maybe one day I will face the elements, be brave, and change from tabby to something as exciting as your projects.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Janet, You are so sweet! Everything is a step at a time. You will be ready for a brave step in weaving before you know it. Practice and enjoy what you know! There’s nothing wrong with tabby. It’s the basis for everything else at the loom.

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

  • Cornelia says:

    Hi Karen,

    I would like to increase the size of the things i’m making. Therefor the question if it is possible to add 4 more additional shafts to my Glimakra counterbalance loom on which I currently have 4 shafts. Could it also be possible that you send the specifics on how to make additional shafts? I would really appreciate that!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Cornelia, Probably the best way to add shafts is to get them from a Glimakra dealer. Besides shafts, you will also need additional lamms, and possibly more treadles. My husband has made all these things for my smaller loom, but it was a very ambitious project, and his advice for others is to purchase the parts from a dealer, if possible.

      All the best,
      Karen

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